Posts Tagged ‘Fireman’

Fairytale and Historic Minifigure Set

December 27, 2010

A new set has popped up on lego.com, unfortunately, it is not available in the States, at least not yet. :(

This is a very different set from most LEGO sets and seems like a fantasy version of the new Community Minifigure Set which also will be available starting in Jan. (again, not sure if it will be in the States yet).

I really like both of these sets. They are full of fun minifigs, great for both boys and girls, and have a lot of potential for all kinds of fun scenes. :)

Apparently both sets will be available in the UK, Australia and European countries. Maybe all of us AFOLs in the States will have to petition Customer Service to bring the set over the pond. That or contact a friend (if you have one) that lives where these are available. ;)

LEGO City Fireman Model

April 15, 2010

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Today I got quiet a surprise when I visited my local Toys “R” Us. There was a life size model of a Firefighter made out of LEGO bricks.

Being the picky Master Model Builder that I am, I couldn’t just look at and admire it, I had to study how it was built.

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The first thing I noticed was that it was very round. Now as I know a little about LEGO building and how many of the models are done now I figured immediately that it was probably designed with Brickbuilder, the internal LEGO computer program that takes 3D computer images and turns them into LEGO models. There a subtle clues that the average non-Master Builder would never recognize.

Here’s a Model Building Tip for you. If you notice the gray stripe right under his belt in the front the way the brick layers curve tell me that this was originally designed by a computer. Why? Well if the model had been designed by hand the curve would have been smoother. A computer doesn’t have the “artist’s eye” so it doesn’t see the abrupt curves as a problem. When Brickbuilder was first used this problem showed up a lot. Over all the model looked impressive, but there were all these funky curves per layer that didn’t make any sense. My guess is that the model designer fixed most of the curves on this model but either didn’t notice the one I mentioned or didn’t see it as important enough to fix.

I encountered that problem myself when I was building my giant lady bug. Transferring the half-dome to make the shell only took a few minutes, but fixing all the funny curves took three days. I also added the black dots at the same time.

Erik Varszegi, Master Model Builder extraordinaire, truly is a master taking Brickbuilder to the next level. He uses it as it is meant to be used, as just one more tool in the Master Builder’s bag of tricks.
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In fact there is a great article about designing with Brickbuilder that Erik wrote in Issue 9 of the BrickJournal Magazine

Just because many of the LEGO models start out with a computer designing them doesn’t mean that Master Model Builders will disappear. The Master Builders still have lots of steps to do before it can go from computer screen to actual 3D LEGO model. ;)

So if you get a chance to see this at your local Toys “R” Us, take a moment to look and admire it.

Eurobricks 10197 Fire Brigade Review

July 19, 2009

I mentioned the 10197 Fire Brigade set last month. Now we can finally see what it really looks like. Jansued, a member of Eurobricks, has done a rather in depth and humorous review of the new Fire Brigade set. There are nice close-up images of the engine, the station itself, and what I find most interesting — how they built the 1932 in plates.

I love what Jansued said about the 1932

I guess this took forever to develop and right now there are running some mentally damaged naked designers through the floors in Billund, Danmark while there shouting 1932 loudly again and again…

Now I am very familiar with the numbers and lettering built in this style. We used it all the time in the Model Shop at LEGOLAND California. When we used it however, we never had to make all the parts connecting per se. Usually it was built as part of a mosaic or into the side of a Miniland building. As long as it was held in by gravity — in other wards just sitting in there — than it was “legal.” Of course we would then glue it, so that it could go out into the park.

I understand how and why they did it the way they did, but I still think it would drive me bonkers too trying to figure it out. :P

If you are interested in reading the full review and seeing all the pictures they can be found at Eurobricks.


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