Posts Tagged ‘Green Grocer’

10230 Mini Modulars

September 25, 2011

I know I’m a bit late on the ball with this one, as its already been covered on all the major blogs and forums already, but I thought I’d add my praise to what looks like a spectacular set!

10230 Mini Modulars

Ages 12+. 1,356 pieces.
US $79.99 CA $99.99 DE 69.99 € UK 59.99 £ DK 649.00 DKK AU $119.99

Available only to our LEGO® VIP Program Members, this exclusive mini modulars set is an authentic miniature representation of the first 5 buildings in the Modular Building series: Café Corner, Market Street, Green Grocer, Fire Brigade and Grand Emporium. Featuring highly detailed design, each building can be displayed as a stand alone piece or connected to the others buildings in the set. The mini Café Corner includes details like a fan above the doorway and printed hotel signage, while the mini Market Street includes transparent bricks and a unique brick construction. The quaint mini Green Grocer also features transparent bricks and a fire escape at the rear, while the mini Fire Brigade includes a brick bell and white arch wall elements. Finally, the mini Grand Emporium has a rooftop sign, skylight and window washing platform. With fantastic detailing and a huge variety of elements in a range of rich colors, this exclusive mini modulars set is the perfect addition to every VIP Member’s collection.

Exclusively available to LEGO® VIP Members!
Authentic miniature representation of first 5 Modular Buildings: Café Corner, Market Street, Green Grocer, Fire Brigade and Grand Emporium!
Each building can be displayed individually or connected to the other buildings in the set!
All buildings feature fantastic detailing and a wide variety of elements and colors!
Completed model measures over 5″ (14.5 cm) tall, 12″ (32 cm) long and 2.5″ (6.5 cm) wide!
Each individual building measures 2.5″ (6.5 cm) long and 2.5″ (6.5 cm) wide!

 

There’s even a video with set designer Jamie Berard explaining the model.

I’m certainly excited about this set! So many fun pieces and interesting connection techniques. Jamie knows what AFOLs (Adult Fans of LEGO) want and continues not to disappoint. 😀

Adventures of Clutch Powers Movie Review

February 24, 2010

P1190813

With the excitement of going to the World Premiere of Adventures of Clutch Powers on Saturday I realized today that I didn’t actually review the movie (can you say duh? 😛 ).

Well as you can probably guess from the above picture, that although Clutch Powers and his team are based in LEGO City (the Theme that is) that end up in a Castle era world. Although I won’t give everything away, I may be giving some of it away so . . .

**** Warning!!!! Spoiler Alert!!!!! *****
In other words, if you want to be totally surprised when you watch the movie, wait until after you have seen it to read further. 😀

The movie spans four LEGO Themes — Power Miners, City, Space Police, and Castle. Now although this seems like a strange mix, and even I found that the storyline was a bit of a stretch, considering that the movie is basically a 90 minute LEGO commercial for all non-licensed LEGO themes it works (well not completely). I counted about 40 or so actual sets throughout the movie.

The movie opens with Clutch “I work alone” Powers down in a mine driving the Thunder Driller (at least I think its that set). He drills into a new area of the cave and happens to find a whole bunch of “power crystals.” While trying to grasp one he runs into what else? A Rock Monster, naturally. After a bit of a scuffle (where you see another Power Miners set get destroyed) with the Rock Monster he happens to escape and get a crystal.

Clutch returns to headquarters, after driving through what seems like the whole city. All of the modular buildings except the newest Grand Emporium are in LEGO City along with the Grand Carousel and the newer Town Plan. There is at least two Creator houses that the protagonist zips by more than once in the film.

On getting at headquarters Clutch finds out that his boss (I forget his name) decides he needs a team. Although none of them want to work together, they decide they have to. Then they get a distress call from the Space Police prison.

You’re probably asking yourself “What?” at this point. I know I was. Not a very smooth transition of story. My theory is that the when they wrote the script, they figured that since all of the LEGO sets exist at the same time on the toy shelves, they can all exist at the same time in the movie. Yeah, sure, that works. 😉

Anyhow, back to the movie.

So they fly (using the Galactic Enforcer ship) that was “created” by their resident scientist Artie to the Space Prison. Upon arriving and finding no one about they get attacked by the evil wizard Mallock the Malign one of three prisoners (the other two are seen as shadowy cloaked figures behind the wizard). Mallock and his cohorts steal their ship, while destroying the two other ships on the landing pad (two more Space Police sets, big surprise). But since it is a LEGO world the team just builds a new ship.

They figure out that Mallock has headed to the medieval planet of Ashlar. This is where I again asked myself “What?” Why would an evil wizard who has magic powers in a “modern” world decide to go back to a medieval planet? Even after watching the whole movie, I was still asking myself this question. The movie definitely is not very big on well thought out story lines.

Once Clutch and his team arrive they find out that they have to help the crown prince fight Mallock and his skeleton army. Without making this review too much longer, they end up wining the war and recapturing Mallock to take him back to the Space Police prison. They learn the valuable lesson, after much squabbling throughout the whole movie, that they need to work together and “build on each other” to get the job done. The movie ends with the team getting yet another mission. Can you say sequels?

All in all the 90 minutes was a little long for me. I loved the cute characters, but the story was just a tad too strung out and slow in the middle. I can see Power Miners and City going together, and maybe even Space Police, but throwing in Castle (especially as the whole second half of the movie) was just a little much, and not in a good way.

6-10 year-olds will like it. The obvious plot holes, the unlikelihood of the story, and the randomness of it all will make perfect sense to them. I enjoyed seeing, but I can’t say that I would buy the DVD.

**** Spoiler Alert Ends ****

I now return you to your regularly scheduled blog post. 😉

BrickCon 2009 has begun

October 2, 2009

Well even without me BrickCon 09 has started (like I’m that important). 😉

Here we see Steve Witt — official LEGO Fan liaison — who, according to Mark Sandlin is holding a “New Pirate Ship” and that will be available January 2010 for $180.00. If that’s true, that’s a pretty sweet model. Even if it’s not true, its still sweet. 😀

Without actually being there, it will be hard to really report much about the events and what not, so I’ll have to rely on others’ pictures and my friends from The Brothers Brick too keep all of us non-attendees up to date. I’ll try my best to troll Flickr to find the best representations of BrickCon 09.

For those of you who have never attended a LEGO convention, it truly is a wonderful experience. To have so many like-minded individuals in one place and to be able to share your creations in real life with people who will appreciate them for what they are (including all the intricate details that the non-LEGO fans would miss) is absolutely enjoyable. 😀

The next LEGO Convention that I know of in the States is Bricks by the Bay which will be held on April 9-11, 2010 in San Francisco. Hopefully I’ll be able to attend, but that’s still months away, so we’ll see.

I also really hope that I can attend BrickCon next year, since I’m really bummed that I’m missing such a fun weekend with so many of my friends. 😦

So, everyone that is at BrickCon 09 and reads this blog, have fun for me! 🙂

Eurobricks 10197 Fire Brigade Review

July 19, 2009

I mentioned the 10197 Fire Brigade set last month. Now we can finally see what it really looks like. Jansued, a member of Eurobricks, has done a rather in depth and humorous review of the new Fire Brigade set. There are nice close-up images of the engine, the station itself, and what I find most interesting — how they built the 1932 in plates.

I love what Jansued said about the 1932

I guess this took forever to develop and right now there are running some mentally damaged naked designers through the floors in Billund, Danmark while there shouting 1932 loudly again and again…

Now I am very familiar with the numbers and lettering built in this style. We used it all the time in the Model Shop at LEGOLAND California. When we used it however, we never had to make all the parts connecting per se. Usually it was built as part of a mosaic or into the side of a Miniland building. As long as it was held in by gravity — in other wards just sitting in there — than it was “legal.” Of course we would then glue it, so that it could go out into the park.

I understand how and why they did it the way they did, but I still think it would drive me bonkers too trying to figure it out. 😛

If you are interested in reading the full review and seeing all the pictures they can be found at Eurobricks.

10197 Fire Brigade

June 15, 2009

At the start of April I blogged a post asking the question “What’s under the black cloth?” We speculated about:

Considering that it is right next to the Green Grocer and the Market Street and the fact that its about the same height, there is a lot of speculation that it is the next Modular Building

We wondered:

No one knows what it really is (except the LEGO designers of course) 😉 but time will reveal if it is really a set or not.

But now we know!

It is indeed the next Modular Building! The 10197 Fire Brigade.

10197 – Fire Brigade

Ages 16+. 2,231 pieces.

US $ 149.99; CA $ 199.99, UK £ 97.85, DE € 149.99

Build an authentic vintage fire station!

Ding ding ding! There’s a fire in town! The fire brigade drives to the scene from this detailed and realistic 1930’s fire station. Designed to fit with other modular buildings like 10182 Café Corner and 10185 Green Grocer, the station features rare LEGO® pieces and innovative construction techniques. It includes a ‘30s-style fire truck, 4 minifigures, a fire-dog, an opening station garage door, and a removable building roof for interior access. It also includes 2 fully-furnished floors with fire-fighting tools, racks for the firemen’s helmets, fire-pole, ping-pong table, kitchen with fully-stocked fridge, couch, bookshelf and a roof with a water tower and bell. Measures 14″ (35 cm) high and 10″ (25 cm) wide.

* Includes a 1930’s-style fire truck, 4 minifigures and a fire-dog!
* Features lots of realistic details including fire-fighting tools, racks for firemen’s helmets and even a fire-pole!
* The station house features an opening station garage door and 2 fully-furnished floors including a kitchen with fully-stocked fridge and a ping-pong table!
* Remove the roof for interior access!
* The roof is equipped with a water tower and bell!
* Fire Brigade features rare LEGO elements including bricks and plates in dark tan, 1×1 dark red tiles, a red hot dog and the 3×6×5 Belleville® arch. It also features gold fireman’s helmets, a tan hand bag and a red sliding garage door!
* Measures 14″ (35 cm) high and 10″ (25 cm) wide.
* Add Fire Brigade to your LEGO® Town and combine it with other modular buildings like 10182 Café Corner and 10185 Green Grocer!

The new element I immediately noticed was the tan Indy pouch. I also noticed the brick-built “1932” (the year LEGO was founded). 😉 As far as I know this is the first time they have included that type of LEGO lettering in an official set, although the Master Model Builders (including myself) have been using this technique for years at the LEGOLAND parks.

I’m glad to see that LEGO is finally showing some of the tricks that the Model Builders have known for years. In fact, that is one of the main reasons I started Model Building Secrets. I wanted to finally reveal the “secrets” of Model Building. They have never really been secrets, its just that no one has come out and explained them. 😀

Any how, sorry for the little tangent, if you would like to see more photos you can see Dunechaser’s Flickr Photostream aka Andrew of Brothers Brick.

The Bad Day is Over, And Now For the Winner

May 25, 2009

Over at Reasonably Clever the Bad Day for Micropolis Contest is over. Because I was a guest judge (I donated a copy of my book ) I didn’t want to post my thoughts on the contest until it was over.

And the winner is:

Not only did Roguebantha win my book, he also won the top prize. 😀 Choosing a prize was really hard, but his just stood out. Especially the Micro versions of the Cafe Corner, Green Grocer, and the Market Street. I loved the look of the rain and lightning too.

Some of my other favorites were Dragma’s Tornado through a trailer park

Dragma’s Tsunami bad day

pbpancho’s Octan HQ is burning!

And Polywen’s It came from BELOW!!!

There were a lot of really good models, and I applaud all those that entered! 🙂

And now, a message from TwinLUG:

The contest may be over, but the FUN doesn’t have to stop!

The first-ever massive Micropolis collaborative layout will be held at Brickworld this year.

Your task: To construct one or more Micropolis modules to add to the huge city layout.

The micropolis standard can be found here: micropolis-micro-city-standard and a number of sample MOCs built according to the standard can be found at the recent Micropolis ‘Bad Day’ building contest at Reasonably Clever

We are hoping to have a HUGE layout, and already have a large number of modules confirmed.

Get building, and have fun!

I look forward to seeing what people come up with. 😉

What’s under the black cloth?

April 2, 2009

what’s this, originally uploaded by Old Republic.

Although I previously mentioned the new set Emerald Night there’s been a video floating around on Youtube where AFOL-turned-Designer Jamie Berard officially annouces Emerald Night (now available at LEGO.com ) and talks a little about the process behind designing it.

What has also been floating around is the question of what is under the black cloth that so suspiciously is sitting on the shelf in the background. Considering that it is right next to the Green Grocer and the Market Street and the fact that its about the same height, there is a lot of speculation that it is the next Modular Building. No one knows what it really is (except the LEGO designers of course 😉 ) but time will reveal if it is really a set or not.

Model Building Tips – Tiles on a Baseplate

September 12, 2008

Sorry for not posting yesterday. Life, as it occasionally does, got in the way. 😉

So, here’s my tip. On several of the Modular Houses sets like the Cafe Corner and Green Grocer LEGO put a layer of tiles to indicate sidewalks, etc. This is all well and good, if you don’t ever have to take to tiles off, but if you do want to actually use your LEGO pieces and baseplates for something else down the line, taking the tiles off can be a real pain in the neck!

When I got my Cafe Corner, I dutifully copied the design, placing the tile directly on to the baseplate. But with the Green Grocer, I got smarter. Instead of following the directions, I first put a layer of two-stud wide plates down. On the edges, and anywhere it would be seen I used green and anywhere else I used whatever color of plate I happened to grab (I sort my larger 2-wide plates by shape only).

Now, if you are using this for a train or town layout and want it to actually attach with other builder’s buildings, this might not work for you (unless they also follow my tip) 🙂 But if it is a stand-alone model this works great, especially when you take the model apart. You can just peel the plates off and then get the tiles off the plates.

Model Building Tips – Using LEGO in unexpected ways

September 7, 2008
Michael Jasper's shopping cart

Michael Jasper's shopping cart

Although I’ve been looking at his models for years, Michael Jasper’s shopping cart really showcases his model building genius. I found this image on Brother’s Brick. The shopping cart is a great example of my current topic – Using LEGO in unexpected ways.

One of the many things that I love about LEGO elements is how endless the possibilities really are. Now I’m not talking about bricks and plates, which naturally have their place. What I am talking about is all the thousands of special elements that LEGO has created over the years. As a Master Model Designer I learned how to look at LEGO elements not as what they were, but what they could be. Every LEGO element was originally designed for a specific purpose, sometimes even for a specific set (lightsabers anyone?), but just because it was designed to be one thing, doesn’t mean that it can’t be used in countless other ways.

I mention the lightsaber because up until its introduction in 1999, who would have guessed what a totally useful piece the lightsaber blade would end up being. Up till that point, the closest thing we had was the 4 brick high antenna or technic tubes (if cut at the right length). But the light saber blade revolutionized LEGO building as a whole. Now available in a wide variety of colors, I find more and more uses for it all the time.

Although the Master Model Builders and the AFOLs (Adult Fans of LEGO) have been doing it for years, LEGO has finally started to catch on. With sets like Green Grocer and Cafe Corner LEGO is finally showing the average consumer that there is more than one way to use a LEGO element.

So, here’s the Tip part: twist and turn your parts, see what it does on an angle, see how many ways one element can connect with another. Michael Jasper and others like him show us all how truly endless the possibilities are if we “Just Imagine.” 😉